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Dublin Moving

Moving to Dublin

&
Moving from Dublin

The city of Dublin has in recent years become the undisputed tech capital of Europe. The development of “Silicon Docks”, the area north and south of the River Liffey, has attracted all the major tech and social media companies.  The likes of Google, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and many more growing companies like Airbnb, Trip Advisor and Paypal have moved to Ireland with a concentrated influx since 2011. Whilst this is good news for the Irish economy perceived as an upside and a positive thing, there is an alternative “cause and effect” downside created by such vibrant activity.

Right now, the challenge is to provide office space to facilitate the growth of these businesses. Thereafter, a further logistical exercise is to provide accommodation for the thousands of workers and their families that are migrating to a city that cannot even accommodate its indigenous population.

As one of the leading family removal companies in Dublin, North East Removals experience daily anecdotal evidence of the massive difficulty for people of all ages in acquiring a home.  The reluctance of banks to lend, despite being bailed out by the Irish taxpayer, is a huge problem. The greed of those same banks in charging three times the average European interest rate (if one eventually qualifies for a mortgage) has forced many couples who want a house rather than an apartment to move to a commuter town because of affordability.

Moving home to the countryside may seem blissful and idyllic as a concept for those raised in the city but the reality is in practice very different. Your new home may be cheaper and therefore you can afford the mortgage, but other costs arise immediately to take the gloss of the computation. Commuting has a financial and a time-loss price. If there are kids in the family, creche care is needed whilst work is done in the city. The cost of childcare and commuting can quickly erode the savings of commuter living. Add the fragmenting of the social fabric of the normal family having parents, grandparents, siblings and friends separated by long distance, and suddenly the upside of business and economic success in “Silicon Docks” and elsewhere in Dublin City becomes more of a negative impact.

Dublin Moving